Archive for May, 2021

Roadmap for Organ donation and transplantation: a multi- stakeholder call to action

Although Europe is a leader in organ donation and transplantation, compared to other continents, major discrepancies remain between countries in terms of transplantation activity. This Roadmap, was produced by the EKHA-led Thematic Network on Organ Donation and Transplantation and is based on the Joint Statement on the same subject, published in 2019. It builds on previous work to provide 12 key areas and specific measures to promote transplantation; offering a framework that can be implemented by EU countries to increase transplantation rates. Achieving a successful EU transplantation programme requires coordination between Member States, improved education in patients, professionals, and the general population, and the provision of suitable legal and financial frameworks. In parallel, an increase in donation rates across the EU is needed, which cannot be achieved without a simultaneous investment in infrastructure, the implementation of approaches to overcoming financial barriers, and educational efforts. EKHA strongly encourages EU policy makers to build on these recommendations to come up with a second EU Action Plan on Organ Donation and Transplantation.

Read the Roadmap here

Save the date! European Kidney Forum 2021: Unmet needs & challenges in access to treatments in Europe: The case of Chronic Kidney Disease

 

The 2021 European Kidney Forum will take place on the 18th June 2021 from 10:30 to 12:00 CEST. The MEP Group for Kidney Health and the European Kidney Health Alliance (EKHA) look forward to the insightful discussions that will emerge from the theme “Unmet needs & challenges in access to treatments in Europe: The case of Chronic Kidney Disease”.

This year’s Forum is organised as part of the Decade of the Kidney™ campaign, an EKHA-led initiative that aims to put the spotlight on Kidney Disease at EU level for the next ten years.

This event will focus on tackling the challenges of access to all types of kidney disease treatments in Europe, such as home-dialysis, transplantation and secondary prevention to combat Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) progression. Long-standing challenges in the access to CKD treatments have been worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, we will explore how to mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 on access to kidney care and promote information and education about different treatment options to both health professionals and patients. Speakers include:

  • Stella Kyriakides, European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, DG SANTE
  • Hilde Vautmans, Chair of the MEP group for Kidney Health
  • Manuel Pizarro, Vice-Chair of the MEP group for Kidney Health
  • Stefan Schreck, Advisory for stakeholder relations, DG SANTE
  • Lieven Annemans, Senior Professor of Health Economics, Ghent University
  • Jan De Maeseneer, Professor in Family Medicine and Primary Care, Ghent University
  • Raymond Vanholder, EKHA President
  • Jeanette Finderup, Clinical nurse specialist, European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association
  • Daniel Gallego, President of the European Kidney Patients’ Federation
  • Henning Søndergaard, Patient Advocate, Danish Kidney Association

 

Register Here   View the Agenda

 

 

The European Kidney Forum 2021 is made possible by the sponsorship of:

Unmet needs & challenges in access to treatments in Europe – The case of Chronic Kidney Disease

 

This year’s Forum is organised as part of the Decade of the Kidney™ campaign, an EKHA-led initiative that aims to put the spotlight on Kidney Disease at EU level for the next ten years. The event will focus on addressing the challenges of access to all types of kidney disease treatments in Europe, including home-dialysis, transplantation and secondary prevention to combat CKD progression. In addition, the event will explore how to mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 on access to kidney care and promote information and education about different treatment options to both health professionals and patients.

Speakers include:

  • Stella Kyriakides, European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, DG SANTE
  • Hilde Vautmans, Chair of the MEP group for Kidney Health
  • Manuel Pizarro, Vice-Chair of the MEP group for Kidney Health
  • Stefan Schreck, Advisory for stakeholder relations, DG SANTE
  • Lieven Annemans, Senior Professor of Health Economics, Ghent University
  • Jan De Maeseneer, Professor in Family Medicine and Primary Care, Ghent University
  • Raymond Vanholder, EKHA President
  • Jeanette Finderup, Clinical nurse specialist, European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association
  • Henning Søndergaard, Patient Advocate, Danish Kidney Association
 
 

The Vascular Access Handbook For People With Kidney Disease is now available

The final edition of the Vascular Access Handbook For People With Kidney Disease, endorsed by EKHA, is now available on the Spanish Multidisciplinary Vascular Access Group (GEMAV) website.

This Handbook, written by GEMAV in collaboration with the Spanish National Federation of Associations for the Fight Against Kidney Diseases (ALCER) and the Catalan Kidney Patients’ Association (ADER), aims to provide Kidney Disease patients with simple and clear information on vascular access for haemodialysis, so that they can resolve any doubts they may have and find answers to their questions.

Read the English short and full versions here and here.

Fighting the unbearable lightness of neglecting kidney health: the Decade of the Kidney™

The latest publication of EKHA provides an in-depth overview of the elements that constitute the current challenges in kidney disease. The publication, which can be used for advocacy purposes, emphasizes the urgent need to reduce the rapidly growing burden of kidney disease worldwide. In Europe, it is estimated that 100 million people live with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and 300 million are at risk of developing the illness. Most are unaware of their condition. Further, 130,000 Europeans are estimated to die from CKD every year, and it is projected to become the fifth leading cause of death globally by 2040.

Kidney disease poses a significant social, psychological and financial burden to both patients and society at large. Many patients with CKD suffer from co-morbidities that demand frequent hospitalisations. In addition, current treatments have severe side-effects and fail to alleviate the physical symptoms of CKD. Continuous uncertainty about treatment availability, and the need for weekly hours-long visits to haemodialysis centres pose a heavy mental health burden on patients. Social, educational and professional developments are often hampered by treatments. This not only leads to increased rates of depression in CKD patients, but also results in productivity losses for society. It has been determined that the extrapolated annual European health care cost of kidney disease is at least as high as that of cancer and diabetes. The environmental cost of CKD is also substantial. Dialysis treatments create an environmental burden as they require high energy and water consumption and produce large amounts of plastic waste.

In the last thirty years, very little progress has been achieved in the development of novel treatment options for kidney disease. The paper calls for investments in research that would focus on improving kidney health as has been the case for cancer research up until now, and to make investment proportional to economic and human cost. Additionally, gaps across countries in the delivery of kidney care services subsist in Europe, in particular, there is significant variability in workforce distribution as well as in access of valid candidates to therapeutic options. Challenges in availability and access to kidney care must be tackled.

Finally, the paper calls for all nephrology professionals, patients and their families, caregivers, and kidney health advocacy organizations, to draw during the Decade of the Kidney™ (2020-2030) the attention of authorities to realize changes in understanding, research and treatment of kidney disease. It must be acknowledged that raising awareness about kidney health will not be sufficient to address current challenges. Prioritising diagnosis and simplifying care trajectories through a collaborative effort between authorities and stakeholders are essential.

Read the full publication here.